"Man-Machine" group exhibition curated by Igor Przybylski and Roman Lewandowski,18.01 – 31.03. 2019 by Dorota Borowa

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Opening 17.01.2019

/ 5 pm
Witches Tower /
 al. F. Nullo 8 / Słupsk

/ 5.30 pm
Small Gallery /
ul. Partyzantów 31a / Słupsk

/ 6.30 pm
Centre for Creative Activities /
ul. Gen. Zaruskiego 1a /Ustka

Exhibition:
18.01 – 31.03.2019


Small Gallery /
 ul. Partyzantów 31a / Słupsk
Centre for Creative Activities /
 ul. Gen. Zaruskiego 1a /Ustka
Witches Tower / 
al. F. Nullo 8 / Słupsk

The album Man-Machine by Kraftwerk (German: power station) was released in 1978. The title song reached number one on UK charts in 1982. More recently, Kraftwerk performed live at London’s Museum of Modern Art in 2012 and Tate Modern in 2013. Their minimalistic, dehumanized music, which has combined several generations of electro, techno, industrial and new romantic artists, also continues to inspire new generations of listeners. In the times of post-humanism and post-Internet, the eponymous Man-Machine seems nothing unusual. The parallel living in the real and virtual worlds is our daily bread. Transhumanism, which advocates the use of science and technology in order to transform people into higher beings (so-called posthumans), has already become a reality. In fact, machine anthropomorphization is now progressing faster

than ever before. On the other hand, post-humanists seek a new way of using the human body. In her book How we Became Posthuman, Katherine Hayles perceives the human body as the original prosthesis, which we can freely expand. The boundaries between the robot and the cyborg have become blurred. Technology and genetics will one day contribute to the creation of a next generation man – a transhumanist posthuman. This relationship between man and machine has become an inspiration for the creation of a series of paintings, objects, sculptures, videos and audio installations – all making up a new project. (Igor Przybylski)

'Thinking About Blue Almonds' at the Project Space in Ormond Studios, Dublin, 12th-19th April by Dorota Borowa

"Stay up late. Strange things happen when you've gone too far, been up too long, worked too hard, and you're separated from the rest of the world" (Bruce Mau, The Incomplete Manifesto for Growth)  Ormond Studios is pleased to present its annual member exhibition 'Thinking About Blue Almonds', featured as part of a short series of events that also involves a film screening, artist dialogues, and a musical performance that revolve around different meanings and interpretations of the colour blue; melancholy, water, infinity, distance, night time etc. The title is taken from the Polish phrase for day dreaming, 'myśleć o niebieskich migdałach', which translates as 'think of blue almonds'.  The exhibition takes the idea of the ‘blue hour’ (l'heure bleue), the twilight between night and day. It responds to this transitional phase - the mundane shift from collectivised industrialised time to private domestic time. This temporal passage tends to serve as a period of activity for artists, who often find themselves taking up the role of night shift worker. The studio space becomes activated as a location where unorthodox temporalities can be carved out from the diurnal rhythms that pattern daily life.  The singular nature of studio space becomes a point of departure; a private physical space that paradoxically acts as a porous boundary between the artist and the world, where ideas and relations are free to cross pollinate and extend beyond their conventional parameters.  Transitional states, ephemerality, non-duality and fluidity are explored on a conceptual and material level throughout the exhibition.  Featuring: Dorota Borowa, Chloe Brenan, Deirdre Brennan, Niamh Coffey, Sarah Edmondson, Hazel Egan, Aideen Farrell and Sarah Wren Wilson.   Exhibition Times:  |Opening| Thursday, April 12th: 6-8pm  |Open| April 13th-19th: 12-4pm  |Closing Event| The Bonk | Blues performance Thursday, April 19th, 8pm Doors 7.30pm PWYC

"Stay up late. Strange things happen when you've gone too far, been up too long, worked too hard, and you're separated from the rest of the world"
(Bruce Mau, The Incomplete Manifesto for Growth)

Ormond Studios is pleased to present its annual member exhibition 'Thinking About Blue Almonds', featured as part of a short series of events that also involves a film screening, artist dialogues, and a musical performance that revolve around different meanings and interpretations of the colour blue; melancholy, water, infinity, distance, night time etc. The title is taken from the Polish phrase for day dreaming, 'myśleć o niebieskich migdałach', which translates as 'think of blue almonds'.

The exhibition takes the idea of the ‘blue hour’ (l'heure bleue), the twilight between night and day. It responds to this transitional phase - the mundane shift from collectivised industrialised time to private domestic time. This temporal passage tends to serve as a period of activity for artists, who often find themselves taking up the role of night shift worker. The studio space becomes activated as a location where unorthodox temporalities can be carved out from the diurnal rhythms that pattern daily life.

The singular nature of studio space becomes a point of departure; a private physical space that paradoxically acts as a porous boundary between the artist and the world, where ideas and relations are free to cross pollinate and extend beyond their conventional parameters.

Transitional states, ephemerality, non-duality and fluidity are explored on a conceptual and material level throughout the exhibition.

Featuring: Dorota Borowa, Chloe Brenan, Deirdre Brennan, Niamh Coffey, Sarah Edmondson, Hazel Egan, Aideen Farrell and Sarah Wren Wilson.


Exhibition Times:

|Opening|
Thursday, April 12th: 6-8pm

|Open|
April 13th-19th: 12-4pm

|Closing Event|
The Bonk | Blues performance
Thursday, April 19th, 8pm
Doors 7.30pm
PWYC